Fugazi

2016-17 NHL Hockey Thread

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from Scott Burnside of ESPN,

The National Hockey League's regular season is upon us, and with it, so many compelling storylines. Here's what's top of mind as the puck gets set to drop on Thursday (Wednesday):

Cut the captain some slack

On Oct. 5, Connor McDavid was named captain of the Edmonton Oilers, making him the youngest NHL captain ever. I have no problem with the assignment. McDavid is a rare talent, to be sure. But I also seem to be in the minority in believing that it's a little over the top to suggest that McDavid, who is only 19 and just 45 games into his NHL career, is already poised to challenge for a scoring title....

Time to double down on discipline

The league has once again embarrassed itself with its handling of supplemental discipline, and we haven't even had a meaningful puck drop yet. But we're not going to batter the NHL Department of Player Safety, even though it is laughable that -- until Radko Gudas was suspended for the first six games of the NHL regular season for his late, high hit on Bruins prospect Austin Czarnik in a preseason game -- the dangerous, reckless play of Gudas, Niklas Hjalmarsson, Tanner Pearson and Andrew Shaw somehow managed to net a total of just three regular-season games in suspensions.

Watch them in sequence and ask yourself if they are the kinds of hits that make the game better. Better yet, why aren't NHL GMs watching those games and breaking into a cold sweat?...

more on each of the above topics plus other storylines...

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from Tony Keller of the Globe and Mail,

Canada is home to the world’s largest, most passionate and most financially committed population of hockey fans. The NHL has less than a quarter of its teams in Canada, but is believed to make more than a third of its revenues here, and a far higher percentage of its profits. Nevertheless, the NHL is based in the U.S., and 23 out of 30 teams are American. And thanks to the way the league divides up revenues, much of the money it earns in Canada ends up supporting struggling franchises south of the border.

Canadian national TV money, for example, is shared equally among all of the league’s 30 teams. That means Hockey Night in Canada revenues are almost entirely dedicated to subsidizing hockey nights in America.

Of the $5.2-billion that Rogers paid for a dozen years of Canadian NHL broadcast rights, about $4-billion will end up in the pockets of U.S. team owners. (The owners, as part of their collective agreement with the NHL Players Association, pay half of their revenues to the players).

In addition, the league also has a kind of equalization system under which the most profitable teams must share some of their cash with the most unprofitable. With a few exceptions like the New York Rangers, the money-spinning machines are Canadian, and the money-suckers are American.

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So pre-season early casualties already include (at least for the opening week):

Crosby, Bergeron, Price, Eichel, Schwartz, Huberdeau, Okposo...

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1 hour ago, Fugazi said:

from Tony Keller of the Globe and Mail,

Canada is home to the world’s largest, most passionate and most financially committed population of hockey fans. The NHL has less than a quarter of its teams in Canada, but is believed to make more than a third of its revenues here, and a far higher percentage of its profits. Nevertheless, the NHL is based in the U.S., and 23 out of 30 teams are American. And thanks to the way the league divides up revenues, much of the money it earns in Canada ends up supporting struggling franchises south of the border.

Canadian national TV money, for example, is shared equally among all of the league’s 30 teams. That means Hockey Night in Canada revenues are almost entirely dedicated to subsidizing hockey nights in America.

Of the $5.2-billion that Rogers paid for a dozen years of Canadian NHL broadcast rights, about $4-billion will end up in the pockets of U.S. team owners. (The owners, as part of their collective agreement with the NHL Players Association, pay half of their revenues to the players).

In addition, the league also has a kind of equalization system under which the most profitable teams must share some of their cash with the most unprofitable. With a few exceptions like the New York Rangers, the money-spinning machines are Canadian, and the money-suckers are American.

more

Supporting struggling franchises? You mean like the Quebec Nordiques or the Winnipeg Jets v1.0, or the Toronto Maple Leafs? Those kinds of struggling teams?

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I see the new NHL Network is off to a great start. It's the 2016-2017 Season Preview on all seven Canadian teams. Jack squat about the rest of the League. 

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37 minutes ago, Fugazi said:

I see the new NHL Network is off to a great start. It's the 2016-2017 Season Preview on all seven Canadian teams. Jack squat about the rest of the League. 

Maybe they're saving it for the prime time.

At this time of the day it's only Canadians and Fugazi who are watching the NHL network. :) 

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from John Matisz at the Toronto Sun,

In the lead-up to the 2016-17 season, Postmedia spoke to a dozen people directly involved in the analytics arm of the sport to gain better perspective on its present and future condition. The group — filled with current team executives, current team statistical analysts, former team statistical analysts, as well as hobbyists — spoke both on and off the record about a variety of topics.

Consider the following a condensed State of the Union on hockey analytics.

PHASE I, PHASE II … PHASE III?

If Phase I of hockey analytics’ infiltration into the mainstream was the NHL’s talent drain of the online stats community two summers ago, it appears we are now knee-deep into Phase II.

Hobbyists are still being picked up — most notably NHLSpecialTeams.comcreator Arik Parnass, who last month landed with the Colorado Avalanche in the early days of the post-Patrick Roy era — while others are back in the public sphere, such as Matt Pfeffer (Montreal Canadiens) and Tyler Dellow (Edmonton Oilers), both of whom didn't get their contracts renewed by their respective teams. And the research being done for public consumption is still grounded by two entry points: The NHL’s Real-Time Scoring System (RTSS) and tracking games manually via TV broadcast.

The cutting edge material available to fans and media in 2016, then, hinges on marrying the stats perspective with coaching tactics and front-office decision-making. The neutral zone, for instance, seems to be the most studied area of the ice nowadays.

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LOS ANGELES – Four veteran play-by-play announcers will work Kings telecasts this season on FOX Sports West as Bob Miller, the club’s Hall of Fame broadcaster, takes a reduced on-air role with the club for the first time.

As announced last month, Miller returns to the FOX Sports West booth for his 44th season and the Kings’ 50th Anniversary as he calls 58 games.  For the 17 games Miller is not slated to work, Gary Thorne (eight games), Chris Cuthbert (four games), Ralph Strangis (four games) and Jiggs McDonald (one game) will call the action alongside TV Analyst Jim Fox.  McDonald, who served as the club’s very first broadcaster in 1967, will now have called an LA Kings game in their first year and again during the club’s 50th Anniversary celebration. 

Thorne has enjoyed a 50-year broadcasting career, covering a multitude of major events and the National Hockey League (for 12 years) including the Stanley Cup Playoffs/Finals for ABC/ESPN and many NHL All-Star Games.  He has also called hockey games for SportsChannel America, the New Jersey Devils and at the University of Maine dating back to 1977.  He currently calls baseball games for the Baltimore Orioles. 

Cuthbert worked for Hockey Night in Canada from 1984-2004 and for TSN since 2005.  He also has called games on NBC and NBCSN.  He called the 2010 Olympic Gold medal game between the U.S. and Canada, the most watched television event in Canadian history.  He has called hockey at every level and has been involved in the ownership group of Guelph Storm (when Drew Doughty was a Junior) and he co-authored the book The Rink Stories from Hockey's Hometowns (which included a chapter on Darryl Sutter and the Viking, Alberta rink).

Strangis is known best as the former “Voice of the Dallas Stars” hockey team.  He was in the booth for 25 years with the franchise going back to their beginnings as the Minnesota North Stars.  For his on-air work, Strangis has been awarded seven Lone Star Emmys, eight Associated Press Awards and a Dallas Press Club Katy Award.  Recently he has written editorial columns and essays for the Dallas Morning News.

McDonald is the “Original Voice of the LA Kings,” working in Los Angeles from 1967-72 during the club’s very first five seasons.  He called the club’s first preseason game, first regular season game and first playoff game.  He has also worked as a club broadcaster for the Atlanta Flames, Florida Panthers and the New York Islanders, totaling more than 3,000 contests.  In 1990 he was the recipient of the Foster Hewitt Award, which is recognized by a plaque in the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto and he will return to Los Angeles for Opening Night as the 1967-68 Kings are reunited.

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9 minutes ago, Getzlaffedat said:

Holy Matthews.  This kid is dirty

 

 

I drafted him in the 12th round last night  :D

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18 minutes ago, Getzlaffedat said:

Matthews hattrick on first 3 shots

 

The kid is dynamite.  Conner who?

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Just now, Getzlaffedat said:

Marner looks really good too.  

 

The young talent in the league is making the old guys look obsolete 

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7 hours ago, seattle__sam said:

Supporting struggling franchises? You mean like the Quebec Nordiques or the Winnipeg Jets v1.0, or the Toronto Maple Leafs? Those kinds of struggling teams?

It's talking about monetary struggles, not sure how the Toronto Maple Leafs enter into that conversation.

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1 hour ago, John96 said:

It's talking about monetary struggles, not sure how the Toronto Maple Leafs enter into that conversation.

That's the jinger.

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1 hour ago, Fugazi said:

 

The kid is dynamite.  Conner who?

Has Pierre McGuire been sighted kneeling in the Leafs locker room?

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2 minutes ago, cjelli said:

Has Pierre McGuire been sighted kneeling in the Leafs locker room?

 

 

He's at Cindy's house comforting the chosen one. He won't leave there until the chosen one is ready to play Hockey

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At least they got rid of that stupid "Conference Runner Up" Banner. 

 

 

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(EDMONTON, AB) – Oilers Entertainment Group (OEG) Chairman Daryl Katz announced today hockey legend Wayne Gretzky has joined the organization in the capacity of Partner & Vice Chair. Gretzky will work closely with Katz and OEG CEO & Vice Chair Bob Nicholson in all aspects of the organization including business and hockey operations.

Iconic Oilers captain and all-time hockey great, Gretzky will work closely with the OEG team on the commercial side of the business to attract world-class sports and entertainment partnerships and events to Rogers Place, as well as supporting development initiatives in ICE District. He will also be a sounding board and resource for Oilers President of Hockey Operations Peter Chiarelli and his team to assist in key functions including player development, recruiting and mentorship. 

“We are absolutely thrilled to have Wayne join the OEG team. He is an icon in the game of hockey, a respected voice across the NHL and a globally known brand,” said OEG Chairman Daryl Katz. “Wayne’s business acumen, along with his innate knowledge of the game of hockey will be a huge addition to OEG as we continue to build our global sports and entertainment business.”

“This is a day that has been a long time coming. The Oilers family is honoured to welcome Wayne back into an official role within the organization where his legendary career began and where he will have a hand in helping both the Oilers and City of Edmonton return to a place of prominence,” added Katz.

Gretzky’s on-ice exploits are the stuff of legend as upon his retirement on 18 April 1999, Gretzky held or shared 61 National Hockey League records. Following his retirement in 1999, Gretzky became the ninth and final player to be immediately ushered into the Hall of Fame, and the first in history to have his jersey number retired league-wide.

Career highlights since retirement include positions as minority owner and Head Coach of the Phoenix Coyotes, Executive Director of 2002’s Gold Medal-winning Canadian Men’s Olympic Hockey team, owner of the popular Toronto bar and restaurant Wayne Gretzky’s, winemaker with the celebrated Wayne Gretzky Estates Winery, and philanthropist with his own Wayne Gretzky Foundation and countless other charitable endeavours.

“I’m honoured to join Daryl, Bob and the exceptional group of people at OEG. Edmonton is a city I love and it has been so good to me and my family,” said Gretzky. “Daryl is building something special with OEG and I’m really excited about being involved with the organization, not just for one year but for years to come."

“We are excited to welcome Wayne back to OEG and the Oilers,” said OEG CEO & Vice Chair Bob Nicholson. “Wayne is a legend of the game and equally as good a person. He will add so much to our growing organization as a leader in all aspects of OEG’s future plans.”

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